EVANGELICAL FEMINISM: A NEW PATH TO LIBERALISM? by Wayne Grudem

Published on September 2, 2015 by Fred Zaspel

Crossway, 2006 | 272 pages

Does evangelical feminism or egalitarianism naturally lead to theological liberalism? You may like to think not, but after reading Wayne Grudem – who surveys the kinds of ways evangelical feminists must treat the Bible – you may have to change your mind!


Contents

PART I:
SOME PATHS TO LIBERALISM IN RECENT HISTORY

1 Introduction
2 The Historical Connection Between Liberalism and the Endorsement of Women’s Ordination in the Church

PART II:
EVANGELICAL FEMINIST VIEWS THAT UNDERMINE OR DENY THE AUTHORITY OF SCRIPTURE

Introduction to Part II
3 Saying That Genesis Is Wrong
     Some evangelical feminists deny the authority or truthfulness of Genesis 1–3
4 Saying That Paul Was Wrong
     Some evangelical feminists say that Paul was wrong
5 Saying That Some Verses Found in Every Manuscript Are Not Part of the Bible
     Some evangelical feminists say that some verses that are in every ancient manuscript
     of 1 Corinthians are not really part of the Bible

6 “Later Developments” Trump Scripture
     Some evangelical feminists say our ultimate authority is found not in what is written
     in Scripture but in developments that came after the Bible

7 “Redemptive Movement” Trumps Scripture
     Some evangelical feminists adopt William Webb’s “redemptive-movement” approach
     and cast all the ethical commands of the New Testament into doubt

8 Is It Just a Matter of Choosing Our Favorite Verses?
     Some evangelical feminists claim that our position on gender roles just depends on
     which Bible passages we choose to prioritize

9  Can We Just Ignore the “Disputed” Passages?
     Some evangelical feminists silence the most relevant Bible passages on men and women
     by saying they are “ disputed”

10 Does a Pastor’s Authority Trump Scripture?
     Some evangelical feminists say that women can teach if they are “under the authority” of
     the pastors or elders

11 Teaching in the Parachurch?
     Some evangelical feminists evade New Testament commands by saying, “We
     are not a church”

12 Tradition Trumps Scripture
     Some evangelical feminists put church tradition above the Bible
13 Experience Trumps Scripture
     Some evangelical feminists put experience above the Bible
14 “Calling” Trumps Scripture
     Some evangelical feminists put a subjective sense of “calling” above the Bible
15 “Prophecies” Trump Scripture
     Some evangelical feminists put contemporary prophecies above the Bible
16 Circumstances Trump Scripture
     Some evangelical feminists put unique circumstances above the Bible
17 Calling a Historical Passage a Joke
     One evangelical feminist nullifies a Bible passage on Sarah obeying Abraham by saying
     that it as intended as humor

18 The Result of Rejecting the Authority of the Bible in These Ways

PART III
EVANGELICAL FEMINIST VIEWS BASED ON UNTRUTHFUL OR UNSUBSTANTIATED CLAIMS

Introduction to Part III
19 Disruptive Women in Corinth?
     Some evangelical feminists claim that Paul told the women in Corinth to “keep silent”
     because they were disrupting the church services

20 Women Homeowners as Elders?
     Some evangelical feminists claim that women homeowners were overseers (or elders)
     in early churches

21 Women Deacons with Authority?
     Some evangelical feminists claim that women deacons had governing authority in
     early church history

22 Uneducated Women in Ephesus?
     Some evangelical feminists claim that Paul told the women in Ephesus not to teach or
     exercise authority over men because they were uneducated and therefore unqualified
     to do so

23 Women Teaching False Doctrine in Ephesus?
     Some evangelical feminists claim that Paul told the women in Ephesus not to teach or
     exercise authority over men because they were teaching false doctrine

24 Women Teaching a Gnostic Heresy in Ephesus?
     Some evangelical feminists claim that Paul told the women in Ephesus not to teach or
     exercise authority over men specifically because they were teaching a Gnostic heresy about Eve being created before Adam

25 Does “Head” Mean “ Source”?
     Some evangelical feminists claim that the Greek word kephalΣ (“head”) often meant
     “source” but did not mean “authority”

26 Strange Meanings for “Authority” — Are They Right?
     Some evangelical feminists claim that the Greek word authenteo (“exercise authority”)
     could mean “murder,” or “commit violence,” or “proclaim oneself author of a man,”
     or could even have a vulgar sexual meaning

27 Is the Son Not Subordinate to the Father in the Trinity?
     Some evangelical feminists claim that the doctrine of the eternal subordination of the Son
     is contrary to historic orthodox Christian doctrine

28 Women Bishops in the Early Church?
     One evangelical feminist claims that a catacomb painting shows an early woman bishop
     in Rome

29 These Ten Untruthful or Unsubstantiated Claims also Undermine the Authority of Scripture

PART IV:
WHERE IS EVANGELICAL FEMINISM TAKING US?

30 The Next Step: Denial of Anything Uniquely Masculine
31 Another Troubling Step: God Our Mother
32 The Final Step: Approval of Homosexuality
33 Some Complementarians Help Evangelical Feminists by Being Harsh, Mean, or Abusive
34 Some Complementarians Help Evangelical Feminists by Being Cowardly or Silent
35 Places Where Evangelical Feminism Already Has Much Influence
36 What Is Ultimately At Stake: The Bible

General Index
Scripture Index


Endorsements

Nancy Leigh Demoss

“The entire Body of Christ owes an enormous debt of gratitude to Wayne Grudem for his courage in taking on what has become a Goliath within the camp of modern-day evangelicalism, and for his noncombative, gracious spirit in doing so. Those who love the truth will find here an invaluable resource in a user-friendly format that is both scholarly and accessible.”


Alistair Begg

“‘Wherever the battle rages, there the loyalty of the soldier is proved.’ In keeping with Luther’s observation, Wayne Grudem takes a vital stand and encourages us to join him. He tackles the issue firmly and fairly and with the clarity we have come to expect from his scholarly pen.”


J. Ligon Duncan III

“The fundamental issue of biblical authority is at stake in the debate between complementarianism and egalitarianism—because if you can get egalitarianism from the Bible, you can get anything from the Bible. The weight of Grudem’s cumulative argument is considerable and cannot be easily dismissed.Egalitarianism is indeed becoming a new path to defection from biblical orthodoxy.”


Michael Easley

“The egalitarian ideology is one of the most significant theological challenges in our time. Wayne Grudem presents a careful and systematic study of the cause and ramifications of this shift. In his persistent and gentle tone, Grudem challenges egalitarian thinking. While authors and scholars sympathetic to egalitarianism may be loath to consider they may in fact be wrong, Grudem pleads with his readers to reconsider their positions.”


Robert W. Yarbrough

“However fervently we hope that the answer to this book’s question is a resounding no, Grudem furnishes evidence that cannot be lightly dismissed. His chapters and charges carry varying weights. But they all flow out of solid scholarship, love for the church, and zeal for the truth. All who welcome the Bible’s teaching should welcome the insights of this concise and valuable study.”


R. Albert Mohler

“This new book is one of the most urgently needed resources for evangelical Christianity, and it represents one of the most insightful and courageous theological works of our time.”

 

Buy the books

Evangelical Feminism: A New Path To Liberalism?

Crossway, 2006 | 272 pages