THE ENDURING AUTHORITY OF THE CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES – Chapter 1, edited by D.A. Carson

Published on July 17, 2017 by Joshua R Monroe

Eerdmans, 2016 | 1248 pages

A Brief Book Summary from Books At a Glance

 

Editor’s Note:  Today we begin a series of “bonus” summaries covering all thirty-six chapters of the monumental volume, The Enduring Authority of the Christian Scriptures (D.A. Carson, ed.). Due to its length, our summaries of each chapter must be brief, but we trust they will give you a helpful taste of what awaits you in this important work.

Special thanks to Dr. Mark Coppenger of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary who summarized most of these chapters himself and who enlisted others (whom we will note also as we go along) for the completion of the task. Their work is very much appreciated.

 

Table of Contents

Chapter 1  
The Many Facets of the Current Discussion
D.A. Carson

Chapter 2
“The Truth Above All Demonstration”: Scripture in the Patristic Period to Augustine
Charles E. Hill

Chapter 3
The Bible in the Reformation and Protestant Orthodoxy
Robert Kolb

Chapter 4
Natural Philosophy and Biblical Authority
Rodney L. Stiling

Chapter 5
German Pietism and Scriptural Authority
John D. Woodbridge

Chapter 6
Wesleyan Theology and the Authority of Scripture: Historic Affirmations and Some Contemporary Issues
Thomas H. McCall

Chapter 7
The “Old Princetonians” on Biblical Authority
Bradley L. Seeman

Chapter 8
Accommodation Historically Considered
Glenn S. Sunshine

Chapter 9
The Answering Speech of Men: Karl Barth on Holy Scripture
David Gibson

Chapter 10
Roman Catholic Views of Biblical Authority from the Late Nineteenth Century to the Present
Anthony N.S. Lane

Chapter 11
The Old Testament Canon, Josephus, and Cognitive Environment
Stephen G. Dempster

Chapter 12
“Competing Histories, Competing Theologies?” Reflections on the Unity and Diversity of the Old Testament(‘s Readers)
V. Philips Long

Chapter 13
Ehrman’s Equivocation and the Inerrancy of the Original Text
Peter J. Williams

Chapter 14
E Pluribus Unum? Apostolic Unity and Early Christian Literature
Simon Gathercole

Chapter 15
Why a Book? Why This Book? Why the Particular Order within This Book? Some Theological Reflections on the Canon
Graham A. Cole

Chapter 16
God and the Bible
Peter F. Jensen

Chapter 17
God and the Scripture Writers: The Question of Double Authorship
Henri A.G. Blocher

Chapter 18
Myth, History, and the Bible
Bruce K. Waltke

Chapter 19
Biblical Authority and Diverse Literary Genres
Barry G. Webb

Chapter 20
The Generous Gift of a Gracious Father: Toward a Theological Account of the Clarity of Scripture
Mark D. Thompson

Chapter 21
Postconservative Theologians Scriptural Authority
Oswaldo Padilla

Chapter 22
Reflections on Jesus’ View of the Old Testament
Craig L. Blomberg

Chapter 23
The Problem of the New Testament’s Use of the Old Testament
Douglas J. Moo and Andrew David Naselli

Chapter 24
May We Go Beyond What is Written After All? The Patterns of Theological Authority and the Problem of Doctrinal Development
Kevin J. Vanhoozer

Chapter 25
Contemporary Religious Epistemology: Some Key Aspects
James Beilby

Chapter 26
Non-Foundational Epistemologies and the Truth of Scripture
R. Scott Smith

Chapter 27
Authority and Truth
Michael C. Rea

Chapter 28
The Idea of Inerrancy
Paul Helm

Chapter 29
To Whom Does the Text Belong? Communities of Interpretation and the Interpretation of Communities
Richard Lints

Chapter 30
Science and Scripture
Kirsten Birkett

Chapter 31
Knowing the Bible is the Word of God Despite Competing Claims
Te-Li Lau

Chapter 32
Qur’anic Challenges for the Bible Reader
Ida Glaser

Chapter 33
Can Hindu Scriptures Serve as a “Tutor” to Christ?
Timothy C. Tennent

Chapter 34
Buddhist Sutras and Christian Revelation
Harold Netland and Alex G. Smith

Chapter 35
Take, Read
Daniel M. Doriani

Chapter 36
Summarizing FAQs
D.A. Carson

 

Chapter 1: The Many Facets of the Current Discussion

D.A. Carson
(Summarized by Mark Coppenger)

As editor, Carson sets the table for the essays to follow, surveying challenges and challengers to biblical authority, engaging some of them critically, and pointing to the pieces he’s selected to answer them. He begins by drawing on Robert Yarbrough’s review article, “Bye-bye Bible?” which tracks the march of higher criticism through the academy and church.

Though critics have gained strong standing in the culture (encouraging some of the orthodox to “sue for peace”), and though a host of apologists have mounted detailed rebuttals in the past, he thinks it’s time for a fresh defense of the Bible – first, to enlist and embolden a new generation of apologists, and second, to take on latter-day arguments from outright enemies and less-than-stalwart friends. And so, in turn, Carson warns against the likes of Thom Stark (positing an “evil” Bible); Stephen Young (disparaging “inerrantist religiosity”); A.E. Harvey (insisting that the Bible must pass muster with current ethical sensitivities); Bart Ehrman (accusing New Testament writers of self-conscious deceit);  David Crump (calling for leaps of faith in the absence of biblical support); Roy Harrisville (acquiescing to the chaos that comes from opening the Pandora’s Box of higher criticism); Craig Allert (seeking to distinguish “Scripture” from “canon”); Joel Green (giving too much weight to communal interpretation); N.T. Wright (consigning “rules” and “doctrines” to secondary status); George Marsden (saying inerrancy rises or falls with Thomas Reid’s philosophy); Vatican II (allowing for error in matters of history); Peter Enns (characterizing inerrancy as more Muslim than Christian); and Timothy Luke Johnson (favoring literary imagination over propositional truth).

As Carson calls the roll of troublemakers, he honors those who have risen to confront them or who have provided helpful material for those who’ll take up the cause, including.  .  .

[...]

The remainder of this article is premium content. Become a member to continue reading.

Already have an account? Sign In

Buy the books

The Enduring Authority of the Christian Scriptures

Eerdmans, 2016 | 1248 pages